Skeet Shooting

Group of skeet shooters

Skeet Shooting
Come Practice With Us

What is Skeet Shooting?

Similar to trap shooting, skeet shooting is a sport in which shotguns are used to shoot clay targets thrown at standardized distances. Shooters are split into groups of five called “squads” and move through a half-moon shape around the field.

The main difference between skeet and trap shooting is that there are two trap houses, which allow targets to be thrown diagonally into the shooter’s field of vision and directly away from them (depending on where you’re standing). Ultimately, skeet shooting offers a wider range of angles than trapshooting.

When competing, 25 targets are considered a full round.

Skeet shooting is really fun to do as a group. It doesn’t matter if you are tall, short, male, female, old, or young. The sport tests reaction, aim, and skill, which means there are no barriers to improvement. But we will note that left-handed shooters normally do well in this sport due to the nature of the positions. So, your lefty friends might have an advantage.

But How Does It Work?

Skeet shooting, like any shooting sport, can look intimidating at the onset. If you have little to no experience shooting, that is a hurdle in itself. Add a moving target, change positions, and then ANOTHER moving target? Well, it’s not hard to see why people get scared away.

That’s why we detail the entire process below. Shooting is a really fun sport to learn and a great skill to improve. Once you get past the first time, you’ll see why shooting sports are becoming increasingly common across the nation.

What You Need To Get Started

First and foremost, you’ll need a shotgun. If you are brand new to this topic, we recommend that you head out to a range, rent equipment, talk to your friends, and test as many different types as you can. It’s all about being as comfortable as possible. The easier you make the process on yourself, the more you’ll come back to it. Like pretty much everything in life!

Don’t be discouraged if this amazing thing that works for your friend does not feel right to you. That’s okay. Everyone is unique and "fit" is a component to it. Believe it or not, "the gun gets a vote".

Second, you need to know that not all shotguns are created equal. To be used in skeet shooting, the gun needs to be able to hold two shells. That means you’ll be using one of the following types of shotguns.

  • Pump - The shotgun is reloaded with a manual pumping action.
  • Semi-Auto - The shotgun automatically reloads the chamber after each fire, but another shot can only be fired with an additional pull of the trigger.
  • Side-By-Side - Also called a double-barrel shotgun, this shotgun has two separate barrels (they sit together horizontally) and can even have two separate triggers for each barrel. Basically, it’s an older style of firearm that is still preferred by some today.
  • Over-Under - This is also a double barrel, but the barrels are specifically placed vertically on top of one another and usually the same tigger actuates each barrel in succession. You pull once for the top barrel and then once again for the bottom barrel.

You are also going to need ammunition, which is specific to the gun that you get.

For those of you coming to try skeet shooting with us, we require that shot sizes between 7.5 and 9 be used, with load sizes no greater than 1-1/8 oz. and 3 drams of powder. This means slugs and shot shells between 00 and 7 are NOT permitted on the clay shooting fields.

If you do not know what load your shells are or are not familiar with shotshell load information, do not load your firearm without approval from a Range Safety Officer.

Basics, A Round of Skeet

To break up even more of the confusion you might be feeling, let’s talk about how exactly “skeet” is shot. As we mentioned above, there are 25 shots of skeet fired in one round. The word “double” is representative of both targets being thrown at the same time. Out of all 25 shots, 17 are shot as singles, and 8 are released as doubles.

When the round is started, they always start with the “high” house first.

There are 8 stations, and the sequence goes as follows:

  • Stations 1 & 2: High house single, low house single, high house/low house pair
  • Stations 3, 4 & 5: High house single, low house single
  • Stations 6 and 7: High house single, low house single, low house/high house pair
  • Station 8: High house single, low house single

The first miss is repeated immediately and is called an “option”. If no targets are missed during the round, the last is shot at the last station, low house 8.

Field

The Okeechobee Shooting Sports skeet fields are arranged in a half moon with 8 shooting stations and 2 trap houses. Shooters move from station to station, ending up in the center at the end of the round. There is a high house on the left side of the field, which throws its clay targets from a trap 10 feet above the ground.

The target rises to a height of 15 feet by the time it travels to the center of the field. The low house target is on the right side and leaves the trap house just 3.5 feet from the ground. It rises to a height of 15 feet by the time it reaches the center of the field.

Below, you’ll find a diagram of the skeet shooting field:

OKSS & All It’s Outdoor Gun Ranges

For over 15 years, Okeechobee Shooting Sports has been tucked in the woods of Okeechobee County, living on a dream. It all started with the hopes of making a safe, welcoming, and wide-open facility for all types in the shooting community. From newbies and novices to those born and bred in gun country, we want everyone to feel welcome.

This place is focused on making this experience the best it can possibly be, and that means a lot of things. Not only do we host a lot of different outdoor ranges, training, and events, but we also offer gunsmithing, carry firearms, and all your shooting accessories.

We pride ourselves on being a good-looking place with good people and a really good offer. If you’re wondering about keeping this hobby as sustainable and accessible as possible, consider a membership.

Let's Get Out There

But, Why Try Skeet Shooting?

Skeet shooting has a long history, but today it’s more popular than ever before. If you don’t use it, you lose it. That goes for everything from leg muscles to shooting skills, so taking advantage of our outdoor gun ranges and fields will help sharpen that skill over time.

You are not going to be perfect the first time, but the progress is incredibly fun to chase and extremely measurable.

On top of being plain old fun (something we could all use more of), it’s also affordable, easy to learn, and accessible. Regardless of age, gender, or physical ability, there is a place for you here.

The shooting community faces a lot of stereotypes, specifically that they aren’t welcoming. And we can safely say that that’s just not the truth. Whether you are a novice who is brand new to anything using a gun or you’ve been shooting skeet for 50 years, you have a place here with us.

Tips For Skeet Skooting

We know how intimidating shooting sports can be for the first time. And it’s not crazy to say that it’s scary the second or third time, either.

So, for any of you who are new to skeet shooting, we’ve got three tips that will hopefully get you breaking more targets next time around.

  1. Establish A Break Point
    This is a rather predictable sport. Nuances of the moment, like the individual mechanism, the weather, or the wind, can play with the path the target follows, but generally, it’s the same every time. So, we recommend choosing a breakpoint.Based on that predictable path, where do you want to break or hit the target?
  2. Be Intentional About Your Feet
    We aren’t joking. Feet placement is an extremely important aspect of a successful shot. You might have your own personal twist, but there is a pattern of success to model. Using the big toe of your forward foot, point your body in the direction of that “breakpoint” we talked about.It’s like a horse going wherever its head is pointed. You can either point your body in the direction of the breakpoint or slightly past it.

    Being consistent with this setup will allow you to sharpen and improve your process every time, which will improve your shot over time. It also allows for your upper body to remain loose and relaxed and allows for good follow through. (think about how a basketball player leaves their hands in the air after they shoot.)

  3. Then, Pick A Hold Point
    This is the position you’ll take when you are preparing to take the shot. Your body is going to want to follow the target, so you should set yourself up to look in the direction the target is heading. A good spot to be is either halfway or two-thirds from the center stake and the house the target is coming from.

If this wasn’t really helpful you can find more about our Clay instruction courses by contacting us here!

How Skeet Shooting Works, What To Expect

Upon arrival, head into the Pro Shop to register and get your field assignment. To save yourself time, you can fill out the waiver here.

What Does Cost

All Clays are $9.75 per round of 25 targets for non-members and $0.34 per target for Executive and Clays Only memberships.

Skeet Shooting & Trapshooting Field Rules

Skeet shooting technically has more rules and etiquette practices than its sporting clays or trap counterparts. Here are some common practices that you should follow in the skeet field.

  • Shooter order is really important, as well as which target gets thrown first.
  • Maintain the proper amount of space behind and outside of the peripheral vision of the person taking their turn.
  • Your firearm MUST be broken open or sitting with the bolt open (meaning completely incapable of firing) when you are not at the station for your turn.

Outside of skeet shooting etiquette, Okeechobee Shooting Sports prioritizes safety above all else. We want everyone to both feel and be safe and comfortable during their entire visit with us.

So, below, we’ve laid out the rules for both our trap and skeet shooting fields.

  • A maximum of two shells can be loaded at any one time.
  • No moving from one shooting position to another with a loaded firearm.
  • Only load at the shooting position, DO NOT load your firearm behind other shooters!
  • Shot sizes between 7.5 and 9 are permitted, with loads no greater than 1-1/8 oz. and 3 drams of powder. This means slugs and shot shells between 00 and 7 are NOT permitted on the clay shooting fields. If you do not know what load your shells are or are not familiar with shotshell load information, do not load your firearm without approval from a Range Safety Officer.
  • Abide by the General Range Rules of the Okeechobee Shooting Sports facility.

Please do not hesitate to ask our staff for help if you have any questions.

If you are found using incorrect ammunition you will be asked to leave the range for the day and may not be able to return. Range safety truly is the number one priority.

What to bring

When you come to practice skeet shooting, we recommend and require that you bring the following.

  • Shotgun—Most any gauge or type that fires at least two shells and has a stock is acceptable
  • Ammunition—Bring at least one box of 25 shells or purchase them at our Pro-Shop
  • Shooting Pouch or Vest—A padded vest is great for softening the recoil, but ultimately, it helps carry ammunition.
  • Shell holder—Pick up a holder to allow for easy movement around the field.
  • Ear Plugs—MANDATORY
  • Eye Protection—MANDATORY
  • Electronic Waiver—If you did not fill out the electronic waiver after Jan 1, 2016, you can save time by doing so here.

What to Wear

We definitely recommend checking the weather. We only offer outdoor gun ranges, which means rain, cold, heat, etc. Wear clothes that you will be comfortable being outside in for (potentially) long periods of time. We also highly recommend closed-toed shoes and sunscreen for any of our fairer friends.

Frequently Asked Questions About Skeet Shooting
What is skeet shooting?

Skeet shooting is a dynamic sport where shooters aim to hit clay targets launched into the air from two fixed stations, testing their speed, accuracy, and coordination. It offers a thrilling challenge and a chance to improve focus and reflexes, while also providing a fun and engaging way to enjoy the outdoors.

What is the difference between skeet shooting and trap shooting?

The main difference is that in skeet shooting, clay targets are launched from two fixed stations and always follow the same paths while the participants move around the field in a semi-circle causing the angles to change, In trap shooting, the targets are launched from a single station, generally moving away from the shooter at different angles.

Do you guys offer trap shooting?

We certainly do! And you can learn more about it here.

Do I need to own a shotgun to try skeet shooting?

Not at all. We have a full selection of rentals in both double barrel and semi-auto styles for you to try the different types.

How fast do the skeet shooting targets travel?

Skeet targets are typically launched at 45 miles an hour to simulate a bird in flight. However, due to the participants changing shooting positions during the game some are flying almost directly toward or away from the shooter making them very easy to hit.

And some positions mean they are flying directly left-right or right left. These are a bit tougher.

What are the “clays” made out of?

They are typically made out of powdered limestone and have a very similar consistency to those reddish clay pots at the landscape store. This means that not only do they break easily when hit, but they are completely biodegradable.

Why are shotguns used for skeet shooting?

For two very important reasons. The first is safety. As the shooter is shooting up into the air, a rifle bullet may travel for miles while shotgun shot will only travel a couple of hundred yards.

The second is because if you want any chance of hitting the clay, you will need a "cloud of shot"!

Get Out There & Test Your Skills

WHERE TO BEGIN

Upon arrival, go to the Pro-Shop to register and get your field assignments. If you are a beginner or want to sharpen your skills, register for the Clays Instruction Class.

Be sure you are ready for the field with the following:

  • Shotgun – Most any gauge or type that fires at least two shells and has a stock is acceptable
  • Ammunition – Bring at least one box of 25 shells or purchase them at our Pro-Shop
  • Shell holder – Pick up a holder to allow for easy movement around the field
  • Ear Plugs – MANDATORY
  • Eye Protection – MANDATORY
  • Electronic Waiver – If you have not filled out the electronic waiver after Jan, 1, 2016, save time by doing so here.

Reserve your spot today

Reservations not mandatory but ensure we have your spot waiting for you.